Traditionality and Modernity in a Globalized Society

By Pearl Chang, Stella Michael-Makri and Justin Akins.

Published by The International Journal of Community Diversity

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Published online: November 15, 2016 $US5.00

Our society is becoming increasingly globalized with an influx of communication between different countries around the world. Researchers have weighed in on the debate between whether globalization is creating one, homogenous global culture or continues to diversify societies through intercultural exchanges. However, previous research has failed to take into account how globalization impacts the individual psyche, particularly with personality variables such as traditionality and modernity. In light of macro-level phenomena such as globalization and modernization, micro-level changes in the individual personality are likely to occur. The debate surrounding whether modernity and globalization suppresses traditional cultures and psyche is examined through a scale construction study with 394 Asian-American/Pacific Islander participants. A single factor structure with nine items measuring traditionality and modernity was discovered using exploratory factor analysis (EFA) with maximum likelihood and an oblique rotation. Findings noted that both traditionality and modernity continue to flourish in the United States, indicating that societal modernization is not leading to cultural dilution. These data are then extended to the case that globalization has been misperceived as an oppressive entity and should instead be viewed as a phenomenon that creates increased diversity and growth for individual personalities to flourish.

Keywords: Traditionality, Modernity, Traditionalism, Modernism, Globalization, Chinese Americans, Asian American-Pacific Islanders, Cultural Psychology

The International Journal of Community Diversity, Volume 16, Issue 4, December 2016, pp.1-16. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Published online: November 15, 2016 (Article: Electronic (PDF File; 860.573KB)).

Dr. Pearl Chang

Assistant Professor, College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clayton State University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Dr. Stella Michael-Makri

Assistant Professor, College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clayton State University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Justin Akins

College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clayton State University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA