Investigating Stress Levels in Male Pre-service Teachers in Teacher Education Programs

By Gretchen Geng and Richard Midford.

Published by The International Journal of Diversity in Education

Format Price
Article: Print $US10.00
Published online: February 19, 2016 $US5.00

The present paper investigated the issue of male teacher shortage from the perspective of male pre-service teachers’ stress level in completing teacher education programs. Using the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and an online questionnaire, there were six significant findings: a) male pre-service teachers had higher stress levels than the general population; b) males preferred to undertake their placement in middle or above level schools; c) the age of male pre-service teachers was strongly correlated with their stress levels; d) over half of male pre-service teachers were not aware of or had no access to support; e) optimistic male pre-service teachers had higher stress levels than pessimistic males; and f) male pre-service teachers found collaborative group work more stressful than other tasks. Stakeholders such as teacher educators, male teachers, and policy makers will find this paper useful in terms of understanding male pre-service teachers’ stress levels and the implications for provision of support in teacher education programs and the retention of male teachers.

Keywords: Male Pre-service Teachers, Stress, Teaching Practicum, Australia; Retention

The International Journal of Diversity in Education, Volume 16, Issue 2, June 2016, pp.27-39. Article: Print (Spiral Bound). Published online: February 19, 2016 (Article: Electronic (PDF File; 507.016KB)).

Dr. Gretchen Geng

Senior Lecturer, School of Education, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia

Prof. Richard Midford

Professor, School of Education, Charles Darwin University, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia; Professor, Menzies School of Health Research, Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia